Shure VP83F external microphone

Recording Audio for Video with an External Microphone

Introduction

When recording with digital cameras, such as the Canon T5i “EOS Rebel” or Sony RX-100 “Cyber-Shot”, you will find the onboard microphone quality is inferior compare to the video quality. To capture better sound, you must use a dedicated microphone such as the Shure VP83F. This microphone allows for superior and highly directional recording, as it uses a super-cardioid pickup pattern, reducing noise from the sides and behind the shooter. It includes a shock mount assembly to minimize noise from the operation of the camera itself: buttons, panning, zooming, etc. For simple operation, this microphone also includes a built-in recorder for you to save files to. Just remember to sign out a micro SD card!

Equipment

Operation

  1. Set up microphone with batteries and memory card.
  2. Attach microphone on top of camera with included shoe mount.
  3. Use the microphone’s headphone jack to monitor audio levels.
  4. Power on with left/green button. Test the microphone. Adjust levels with center button.
  5. Start (audio) recording with the right/red button. Press again to pause or unpause.
  6. Record your video using the Canon or Sony camera controls.
  7. Note! Be sure to slate the audio/video recordings. You can use your hands as a clapper.
  8. Hold the right button down for at least one second to stop recording.
  9. Subsequent recordings will create additional files on the flash card.

Synchronizing Audio and Video

  1. Transfer video files from camera/card to computer via USB or SD card slot.
  2. Transfer audio files from mic card (with micro-to-SD adapter) to computer via card slot.
  3. Import video files into editor (eg. Adobe Premiere) and mute its (camera) audio track.
  4. Import dedicated microphone’s audio file into the same editor/project on separate track.
  5. Note! The Shure outputs a monophonic (not sterero) signal, which is normal for its type.
  6. Line up clapper image and audio. It should be visible as a spike in the audio waveform.

Further Information